¿Qué?

Listening to native Spanish speakers is a humbling experience.

They blurt their words out so fast, sometimes it’s impossible to keep up. And it can be discouraging – after all that studying, shouldn’t you be able to understand spoken Spanish better by now?

Why you’re still struggling to understand spoken Spanish

If you find listening to native Spanish speakers overwhelming, it could be because you’re used to the “learner friendly” version of Spanish in textbooks and apps: slow and clear with simple grammar and vocabulary.

These tools are great because they make it easy to get started – like learning to ride a bike with training wheels.

But Spanish speakers don’t talk like that in real life. They mush their words together, mix up grammar structures and use words you won’t find in your Spanish course.

If you want to understand natural spoken Spanish, at some point you need to take off the training wheels and practice listening to real conversations.

How?

With the right tools, it’s simple.

Train yourself to understand spoken Spanish with Juan from Easy Spanish

A brilliant tool for learning to understand natural spoken Spanish is the Easy Spanish YouTube channel.

In his videos, Mexican producer Juan and friends take to the streets and ask questions like “what was the happiest moment of your life?”, “what’s the most embarrassing thing you’ve ever done” and “how do you flirt in Spanish?”.

The conversations are fun, spontaneous and 100% authentic Spanish.

Importantly, Juan adds dual subtitles so you can check what you heard against a word-for-word Spanish transcription, and consult the English ones if you get stuck.

It’s my absolute favourite resource and I’ve recommended it in practically every post I’ve ever written about learning Spanish (see below for a step-by-step guide on how I used Easy Spanish to train my listening skills).

That’s why I’m excited to bring you today’s interview with Juan from Easy Spanish. In line with Juan’s mission of giving you inside access to authentic language and culture, our chat will transport you to a little plaza in Mexico, where you can see Mexican life unfold in the background with builders, policemen, and friends laughing together.

You’ll learn:

  • Why learning Spanish with classes, books and apps is not enough.
  • How to train yourself to understand real spoken Spanish, without leaving the house.
  • A special technique Juan has used to learn 3 languages.
  • Some naughty Mexican slang (caution: don’t use these words with your friends’ parents!)

For extra listening practice, the interview’s almost entirely in Spanish – if you need a little help figuring out what we’re saying, turn on the English subs.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Once you’ve had the chance to watch, check below for details about Juan’s exciting new project, and how you can help him get it going.

Help Easy Spanish go to Spain!

Easy Spanish is an independent project – to keep it going, Juan relies on donations from Spanish learners like you.

His next mission is to record episodes in Spain so he can keep giving you inside access to language and culture from all over the Spanish speaking world.

At the moment, he’s collecting for a trip to Spain via crowdfunding. Can you help?

There are some brilliant bonuses, including:

  • Access to a private WhatsApp group, where you can practice your Spanish and follow Juan’s adventures in Spain.
  • PDF exercises to help you practice what you learn in the videos
  • A private chat with Juan in Spanish about his experiences.

He’s close to his target (but not there yet) so a donation from you could make all the difference!

Click here to help Juan take Easy Spanish to Spain

If you can’t donate, you can still help him by sharing the link to his crowdfunding page. Gracias!

How I trained myself to understand spoken Spanish with Easy Spanish

Here’s how I’ve been using Easy Spanish to improve my listening skills:

  1. Watch an Easy Spanish video without subtitles (cover them up with a piece of paper, or better get access to videos without subtitles by supporting Juan on his Patreon page)
  2. Listen again, but this time press pause (space button) after the sentences you didn’t understand. Use the back arrow on your keyboard to skip back 5 seconds. Do this several times until:
    1. You understand the sentence or…
    2. if, after listening to the word/phrase several times you still don’t understand, look at the Spanish subtitles.
  3. Compare the subtitles to the audio: Which parts didn’t you understand? Why?
  4. If there are words you didn’t know, look them up in a dictionary and write them down to review later.
  5. If you recognise the words, why didn’t you understand them? Do they sound different to how you expected? Pay attention to how sounds change in fast speech.
  6. If you need to, check against the English subtitles to make sure you understood everything.
  7. Continue until you’ve finished the dialogue, then repeat the process with a new video.

By working in this way, you’ll train yourself to understand spoken Spanish and pick up lots of words and phrases that will help you sound more natural when you speak.

Related posts

The 11 best tools for learning Spanish: from beginner to advanced

Become fluent in Spanish in 1 year without leaving the house: A step-by-step guide

My mission to become fluent in Spanish: How baby steps lead to really big results

The lazy person’s guide to learning Spanish

How to type Spanish accents (+ those other fiddly symbols: ¿ ¡)

¿How do you type that upside-down question mark thingy?

If you’re learning Spanish and you’re planning to write or take notes on a computer, at some point you’ll probably ask yourself this question. You’ll also need to type the other Spanish accents and characters like:

á, é, í, ó, ú, ü, ñ, ¡

But they can seem a bit fiddly. Are they really that important?

Well, Spanish speakers will probably know what you mean without them. But it looks sloppy – a bit like forgetting capital letters, commas and question marks in English:

if i type like this in english you know what im saying but theres something not quite right

The quick and easy guide to typing Spanish accents

If you want to wow people with your slick Spanish, you’ll need to get those accents and characters right.

Luckily, it’s easy when you know how!

Read on to learn how to type Spanish accents and characters on:

  • A Mac
  • A PC
  • Your smartphone

How to type Spanish accents on a Mac

How to type accents on Spanish vowels

With newer Mac operating systems, typing accents above vowels is simple: just press and hold the letter you want to accent. Next, a menu pops up with all the possible accents. Select the accent you need or press the corresponding number.

To type á, é, í, ó, ú and ü on a mac, just press and hold the vowel you want to accent.

How to type ñ

For ñ, use this keyboard combination:

  • Press and hold the alt key (sometimes known as option)
  • Whilst still holding alt/option, press n
  • Wait for the ˜ symbol to appear (highlighted in yellow)
  • Now let go of both keys and press n again.
To type Spanish characters like ñ, ¡ and ¿, you’ll need to use a keyboard combination with the alt key (sometimes known as option).

How to type ¿

For the upside down question mark use this combination:

  • Press and hold alt/option + shift
  • Whilst holding alt/option + shift, press ?

How to type ¡

The keyboard combination for the ¡ symbol may change depending on which computer you’re using (for mine, it’s alt/option + ?).

Here’s a simple way to find it on your keyboard:

  • Press and hold the alt/option key
  • Whilst still holding alt/option, play around pressing a few keys
  • You’ll see a few random symbols come up, like ∆º¬øæ… Keep going until you find ¡

How to type Spanish accents on an old-school Mac

If you want to type á, é, í, ó and ú, but you don’t see a pop-up menu when you press and hold the vowel, you can type the accents with a simple keyboard combination.

The specific key will depend on the keyboard you have, but you can find it easily by using the following method:

  • Press and hold alt/option
  • Whilst holding alt/option, play around by pressing a few keys until you find this symbol: ´ (highlighted in yellow). On my keyboard, it’s the number 8.
  • Now let go of both keys and type the letter you want to accent.

How to type Spanish accents on windows

If you have the U.S. international keyboard installed, you can type Spanish accents on Windows by simply typing an apostrophe followed by the vowel you want to accent.

á = ‘ + a

é = ‘ + e

í = ‘ + i

ó = ‘ + o

ú = ‘ + u

Here are the keyboard combos for the other accents/characters:

ü = ” + u

n = ˜+ n

¡ = alt + !

¿ = alt + ?

You can install this keyboard by searching language settings > options > add a keyboard > United-States International. Once you’ve installed it, you’ll see a language bar has appeared next to the clock in the start bar. If it’s not already selected, click on the language and select ENG INTL.

How to type Spanish accents on different keyboards

If you have a different keyboard, you can type accents and characters by holding down the alt key and typing a 3-digit number.

Important: for this to work, use the number pad on the right side of your keyboard, not the ones in a row across the top of the letters. If you don’t have one of those pads, you’ll find a solution below.

Here are the codes (character appears when you release the alt button)
á = Alt + 0225
é = Alt + 0233
í = Alt + 0237
ó = Alt + 0243
ú = Alt + 0250

ü = Alt + 0252
ñ = Alt + 0241

¿ = Alt + 0191
¡ = Alt + 0161

It’s probably a good idea to put a little cheat sheet next to your desk for a while to help you remember the codes!

How to type Spanish accents on a keyboard with no number pad

If your keyboard doesn’t have a number pad to the right-hand side, you might be able to change the keys at the top right (e.g: 7,8,9,U,I,O,J,K,L,M) into a number pad. If you have this option, you should see the corresponding numbers under each letter.

To activate this number pad, you’ll need to use the Num Lock key (sometimes known as Num LK or Num). The exact steps to activate the number pad will depend on your keyboard/computer set up, but here are some of the most common:

  • Press the Num Lock button
  • Shift + Num Lock
  • Num Lock + Fn
  • Num Lock + Alt

Once you’ve found your number pad, you can get the Spanish accents and characters by typing the Alt+ number combinations above.

How to type Spanish accents with the character map

Another way to find Spanish accents and symbols in Windows is by using the character map.

  • Go to the start button and search for character map.
  • Scroll down to find the letter/character you want.
  • Copy and paste it into your document.
You can use the character map to type Spanish accents and characters on Windows.

Searching for the letters and symbols can get a little cumbersome, so if you’re going to use a character map to type Spanish accents, you could create a new document with all the Spanish accents and characters so you have them to hand.

How to type Spanish accents on Microsoft office

If you’re using Microsoft Office, you can add accents to vowels by pressing and holding the following keys together:

  • Ctrl
  • vowel you want to accent

For example, to put an accent over the letter a, press: Ctrl + ‘ + a =  á

 

Bonus: How to type Spanish accents and characters on your phone

What about if you want to chat in Spanish on your smartphone?

With most smartphones, typing accents on keyboards is simple: just hold down the letter you’d like to accent, and a menu will pop up.

To type Spanish accents and characters on your smartphone, just press and hold the letters or symbols and a menu will pop up.

To turn question marks and exclamation points upside down, hold these buttons down and you’ll see a menu with the inverted versions.

Related posts:

The lazy person’s guide to learning Spanish

The 11 best tools for learning Spanish (from beginner to advanced)

Become fluent in Spanish in 1 year without leaving the house: a step-by-step guide

Over to you!

Do you know how to type Spanish symbols on your keyboard now? Write a Spanish sentence below, using some Spanish accents and characters!

I love travelling.

I love jumping on a plane, hopping out the other side and being surrounded by different people, sights, smells and of course, languages.

I even love that awkward feeling of trying to use the lingo with the locals and being met with a confused stare or nervous laugh, because I know it’s the start of something great: if I persevere, I’ll be fluent one day.

Despite this, I’ve done most of my language learning missions without spending long periods of time abroad. Living in a new country sounds exciting, but it’s not very practical. I’ve got all kinds of good stuff going on here that I don’t want to leave behind, like a relationship, job and friends.

I love travelling in Spain but I’m can’t move there. So I’ve found a way to become fluent in Spanish from home instead.

Maybe you’re in a similar situation. You want to learn Spanish, but for work or family or whatever reason, you can’t move to Spain or Latin America to do it.

If this sounds like you, I have good news: you don’t need to go abroad to become fluent in Spanish. You can do it from the comfort of your own home, in your fluffy socks.

I did something similar back in July, when I decided to become fluent in French from my living room. Now, I’m planning on doing the same thing for Spanish. In this article, I’ll share my step-by-step plan that you can use to become fluent in Spanish without leaving the house.

But first…

Why you don’t need to go to the country to learn a language

It seems like every time people start talking about foreign languages, someone tells the story about how the only way to learn a language is to go to the country. Sometimes they’ll give examples of a friend or a family member who went abroad and picked up the language easily because they needed it to survive.

But the idea that there’s something magical about being in the country that makes language learning effortless is simply not true.

For a start, it’s easy to live in a foreign country without learning the language. Immigrants do it all the time (especially the ones from Western societies who are sometimes referred to as expats).

Secondly, if you don’t have a decent command of the language before you get there, you’ll struggle to make friends in the language you’re learning. And if you’re an English speaker, unless you’re going somewhere remote where no one else speaks English, you may have to battle to find opportunities to speak the language, because everyone will want to practice their English with you.

The reason some people have more success with languages while living in the country is due to a change in approach, rather than anything special about being in the country. I experienced this firsthand when I moved to Italy. Living in the country changed the way I learnt Italian in two important ways:

  • I stopped focusing on trying to memorise grammar rules and vocabulary and started using the language to communicate with human beings.
  • I spent lots of time practicing speaking.
I learnt Italian faster in Italy because I spent less time studying grammar rules and more time chatting to Italians. But you don’t need to be in the country to do that.

The good news is, you don’t need to be in the country to do these things. These are situations you can easily recreate at home: I know because I’ve done it with the other languages I’ve learnt. In the next section, I’ll show you how you can apply these ideas to become fluent in Spanish from home.

 

Become fluent in Spanish without leaving the house: A step-by-step guide

Step 1: Define your goal

If your goal is to become fluent in Spanish, you’ll need to decide what that means first. This can be tricky because the word “fluent” is a bit vague. To some people, you’re fluent as soon as you can have a basic conversation. For others, you shouldn’t say you’re fluent until you sound like a native speaker. For me, fluency means being able to function more or less as a native speaker would in everyday situations. This means:

  • I understand most things I hear (except strong accents, local slang, or specialist vocabulary).
  • I can talk quickly and native listeners understand me without straining.
  • I rarely have to search for words (unless it’s specialist vocabulary or a momentary slip).
  • I probably still make mistakes and have a slight foreign accent, but they don’t impede communication.

If you’re the type of person who needs a bit of pressure to get motivated, you could consider setting yourself the goal of passing an exam. The DELE Spanish exam at B2 level would fit in with the definition of fluency described above.

Step 2: Give yourself a deadline

Your deadline will depend on how much time you can put aside to study each day. If you’re starting from scratch, you could reach this level of fluency in 1 year by studying for 2 – 3 hours per day. If you’re already at an intermediate level, you could get there in about 6 months.

If this sounds intense, don’t worry – this doesn’t mean hours of “school-like” studying from grammar books. The better you get at Spanish, the more you’ll be able to fill this time with stuff you really enjoy doing, like chatting to Spanish speakers, reading books/magazines/newspapers or watching TV and films.

Learning a language doesn’t have to be boring or stressful. To find out how to enjoy the process, you might find these posts useful:

How to learn a language at home (even if you’re really lazy).
The 11 easiest languages (and how to make any language easy).

Also, remember that by the end of the year, you’ll be fluent in Spanish. It’ll take time and effort, but it’ll be so worth it.

Once you’ve got your deadline, break it up into mini goals. This is important because a year feels very far away, which makes it easy to find excuses to keep putting off learning Spanish. Here’s an example of 3 mini goals you could set yourself over the course of the year.

  • After 3 months: I can have conversations about simple things.
  • After 6 months: I can talk comfortably about familiar topics.
  • After 12 months: I can speak fluent Spanish (in line with the definition in step 1)

What if you don’t have that much time to dedicate to learning Spanish each day?

No worries! There’s no rush – just decide on the amount of time you can dedicate to learning Spanish and adjust your deadlines accordingly.

Alternatively, you could aim for a slightly lower target (B1 CEFR level) – still a great level where you can chat quite comfortably in everyday situations.

Keep in mind that these figures are guidelines: everyone’s different and how long it takes could depend on several factors, such as your experience with languages, whether you are able to stay positive and the amount of speaking practice you do during this time. Don’t worry if it takes you a little longer than anticipated: keep going and you’ll get there!

Step 3: Get into a routine

To become fluent in Spanish, decide which actions you’ll need to take each day, then ACTUALLY DO THEM. Forgive me for shouting, but this is the most important bit of the whole guide.

You’ll need to think about:

  • How long you’ll study each day.
  • When and where you’ll do it.
  • What you’ll do in that time.

A typical day might look something like this:

  • Listen to Coffee Break Spanish as you eat your breakfast.
  • Review vocabulary using a flashcard app on your phone whilst stuck in traffic or waiting for the train.
  • Listen to an audiobook for Spanish learners during your commute.
  • After work, you could do a lesson with an online Spanish tutor, study a chapter from a textbook or if you’re feeling tired, chill out in front of some YouTube videos like Spanish Extra or Easy Spanish.
  • If you feel like going out, you could meet a native Spanish speaker in your area and set up a language exchange at the pub (more on this later).

We all have different timetables and tastes, and what works for one person may not work for another. I like to get up an hour early and squeeze my study time in before work because I tend to get distracted later and may not get around to studying. However, some people feel more focused in the evening. Take some time to experiment until you find a language learning routine that works for you.

One thing I recommend to pretty much everyone however, is to get yourself some headphones and listen to podcasts like Coffee Break Spanish and Notes in Spanish as you go about your day: on your commute, walking to work, running in the park, washing the dishes, cleaning the shower etc. It’s amazing how much extra Spanish you can squeeze in by doing this, and it doesn’t take any time out of your day.

Also, remember that you don’t need to start everything at once. Routines that are established slowly are usually the most steadfast. Work towards your ideal routine little by little: for example, if you plan to study Spanish for an hour before work, you could start with 5 minutes, then increase your study time for one minute per day until you’re up to 60.

Importantly, once you’ve sorted out your routine, focus all of your energy on that and forget about everything else.

Why?

If you focus on steps 1 and 2 (setting a goal and deadline) but forget about the things you need to do each day to actually get there, you’ll never become fluent in Spanish. This is the way people normally try to achieve things and the reason lots of people never reach their language learning goals.

Alternatively, if you skip the first two steps and just focus on doing your Spanish routine every day, you’ll become fluent in Spanish sooner or later anyway.

Having a goal and a deadline is handy because it gives you something to aim for. But the real secret to becoming fluent in Spanish is getting into a good routine. If you only follow one step from this guide, make it this one.

Step 4: Find your tools

If you’re going to be spending a couple of hours a day learning Spanish, you’ll need to find some fun and useful things to do during that time. Experiment with different resources like textbooks, podcasts and YouTube channels for Spanish learners until you find things you like that help you make progress.

Not sure where to find tools for learning Spanish? These articles might help.

The 11 best tools for learning Spanish from beginner to advanced
The lazy person’s guide to learning Spanish
32 Fun ways to learn a language (that actually work)

Step 5: Measure your progress

Learning a language is like watching a plant grow. From day to day, the changes are almost imperceptible. But if you can step back and look at it after a few months, you’ll see that it’s grown loads.

Language learning happens so gradually that it can feel like you’re not making progress, which is demotivating. One way to resolve this is to record yourself speaking every now and then so you can look back and notice how far you’ve come. This will show you that your hard work is paying off and give you extra motivation to keep going.

To see what I mean, check out what happened when I recorded my progress in German over 3 months. Day to day, I felt like I was getting nowhere, but when I compared day 1 with day 90, I was quite pleased with how much I’d learnt.

Step 6: Find your people

One reason learning a language in the country seems easier than learning in the classroom is that it transforms a boring school subject into a way to communicate with other human beings. Instead of studying to pass a test, you’re learning Spanish so you can chat to your mate Carlos about a girl he met last weekend.

The more you can see Spanish as means of connecting with people, the more motivated you’ll be and the faster you’ll learn. But how can you do this without living in the country?

You can take advantage of this newfangled technology called the “Internet”, which allows you to connect with Spanish speaking people on the other side of the planet, from the comfort of your living room. This tool, which has revolutionalised language learning, is your most important ally in your quest to become fluent in your Spanish without putting pants on.

I use fab website called italki, where you can find loads of native Spanish tutors waiting to talk to you on Skype for a very reasonable price. Just this week I’ve had lovely chats with María from Venezuela and Carlos from Mexico for less than $10 an hour. If you fancy giving it a go, click on any of the italki links on this page to get a free $10 dollar voucher after your first lesson.

If you prefer a completely free option, you can also use italki to set up a language exchange with Spanish speakers who want to learn your language: this way you can talk for half the time in your native language and the other half in Spanish (just make sure you’re strict about the 50/50 rule right from the beginning, so your partner doesn’t hijack your Spanish speaking time!)

Alternatively, if you’d rather make real flesh and blood friends, you can use the internet to find Spanish speaking people in your area. Conversation exchange is a great website for this.

If the idea of speaking Spanish makes you feel nervous, you might find this article useful:

What’s stopping you from speaking a foreign language (and how to fix it)

Step 7: Talk as much as possible

Grammar exercises and language learning apps might make you feel like you’re doing something useful, but the best (and most enjoyable) way to learn how to speak a language is by talking to people. The more you practice speaking, the more fluent you’ll be. Simple as that.

Whether you pay tutors for online conversation lessons, or set up language exchanges, make it your priority to find people you enjoy spending time with and practice speaking Spanish with them as much as possible. Once you do this, becoming fluent in Spanish is just a matter of time.

My plan to become fluent in Spanish

Next, I’ll explain how I’m going to apply these ideas to help me become fluent in Spanish from my living room.

Set a goal + deadline

I’m already at an intermediate level in Spanish, so I’m going to give myself 6 months to become fluent.

Get into a routine

I’m aiming to learn Spanish for 2 hours a day over the next 6 months. As I’ve just finished my French mission, I already have a routine that sets 2 hours aside for language learning, so I just need to switch the language from French to Spanish. However, if I was building a routine from scratch, I’d start very small, say 5 minutes per day, and increase the time gradually using the technique I discussed in step 3.

Here’s a list of things I’m planning to do integrate into my Spanish learning routine:

  • Watch Spanish CNN while I eat breakfast and drink coffee.
  • Write a daily diary in Spanish.
  • Do at least 3 conversation lessons per week with my Spanish tutors on Skype (via italki).
  • Learn 200 words per month (about 6 per day) on my Flashcard app. To find out how I use flashcards to learn vocabulary, check out this post on how to remember words in a foreign language.
  • Listen to Spanish podcasts while I’m going about my day.
  • Integrate Spanish into my downtime. 2 hours a day is a lot, and if it felt like work all the time I’d never manage to keep it up. For this reason, I’m going to include lots of fun activities I can do in my downtime, like audiobooks, Spanish-language TV series on Netflix, TedTalks in Spanish, dancing around the house like a crazy lady and singing along to Cypress Hill in Spanish…

What about you?

Are you learning (or planning to learn) Spanish from home? Leave a comment and let me know: What’s your goal and deadline? Do you have a Spanish learning routine to help you get there?